Support the Victorian nurses – All out, go the redshirts

February 27, 2012

I’ve just driven past the Victorian nurses demo outside the Austin hospital in the pouring rain. Gave a huge blast on the car horns, coincidentally had Heaven17 in the CD player with ‘Fascist Groove Thang’ blaring out of the open windows.
What a hoot.
But seriously, the Victorian nurses are taking unprotected industrial action by walking off the job,  and are risking fines and loss of pay in a dispute that’s become one of the longest EBA stand-offs in recent times (109 days and counting).

It’s a very public, loud and colourful campaign by the nurses and I think they have strong public support. The issues are around pay and conditions for staff, but also about patient safety and amenity in hospital too. A key demand is no loss of patient-staff ratios at hospitals.

That seems fair enough to me and in the public interest. Popular industrial action like this makes it hard for the state government to attack them outright – yet.

The crisis in the health system will not be fixed by cutting staff hours.

Nurses direct action is the way to go.

I wonder if this might be the prelude to a lock-out, or even ‘wildcat’ action by more nurses.

Nurses pay is being stopped if they do not work as directed.

Nurses are being encouraged to join the industrial action.

Hospital-specific alerts from the union website list ongoing rollling stoppages at all major hospitals across the state.

Working nurses are being encouraged to donate to a nurses strike fund.

Nurses and Midwives Hardship Fund and community support

ANF (Vic Branch) advises that the Nurses and Midwives Hardship Fund has received, and is continuing to receive, many donations from members of the Victorian community who respect the work that nurses and midwives do, and respect the commitment and sacrifice that members are making to ensure Victoria retains a high quality public health system.

Many nurses and midwives face having their pay docked for participating in the stoppages. Nurses, midwives and mental health nurses who are not directly involved in the stoppages are encouraged to donate to the Hardship Fund. You can do so by:

  • EFT payment:    Account name:     ANF (Vic Branch) Victorian Nurses Welfare & Hardship Fund
    BSB:             083 266    Account No:          859680424
  • donating online at https://anfvic.wufoo.com/forms/z7p4x5/ using a paypal account
  • dropping into ANF (Vic Branch) offices at at Level 5, ANF House, 540 Elizabeth Street, Melbourne (across from the Vic Market), or
  • by cheque or credit card by downloading the form at http://tiny.cc/lw2kj. Cheques should be made payable to ‘ANF (Vic Branch) Victorian Nurses Welfare & Hardship Fund’ and mailed to: Box 12600 A’Beckett Street PO, Melbourne Vic 8006.

SMH


The Egyptian revolution: progress report provides fascinating insight

February 14, 2012

We all have that feeling. Coming across a piece of writing that so clearly articulates a deeply-held idea that resonates.

“I wish I’d written that.”

The sweetness of excitement and discovery tinged with the slightest sour of regret and professional jealousy.

I came across just such a moment while reading a great account of the state of play in Egypt over the last few months.

The fallacy of misplaced concreteness is a besetting sin of journalism. Where good ethnography opens up all the fascinating and frustrating contradictions of everyday life as lived by people, journalism summarizes and papers over these differences, subordinating them to the persuasive power of narrative.

There’s a place for both but having been a journalist, I prefer ethnography.

And yet, even after 15 years as an anthropologist, I still find it easier to write narrative like a journalist.

[Egyptian Struggles Continue]

This is from Mark Allen Peterson’s remarkable blog Connected in Cairo. The post is dated 6 February 2012.

Peterson is a  journo-turned-ethnographer. A well-worn path for people moving from a professional life into an academic second-life.

I love the line about the misplaced concreteness of journalism. It is the type of blinkered thinking that leads to ideological blindspots and the pack mentality of political reporting.

It is appropriate to in relation to most of the coverage I’ve seen of the Egyptian revolution.

it’s also why the story of Australian freelance Austin Mackell is important.

Austin and his colleagues were arrested a few days ago by authorities for travelling to Mahalla, a hotbed of trade union activism against the military regime in Cairo. Some trade union activists were also rounded up.

It seems like Mackell is to be released and deported from Egypt, which is a shame because  not many other reporters are getting to the trade union story.

Instead the prefer the misplaced concreteness of what they understand – the parliamentary politics and machinations of the political parties. The heroes of the street – those who made the revolution of a year ago – are now relegated to walk-on parts as props, not actors on the main stage.

Mackell was in Mahalla to interview a trade union leader, but as he explained on ABC’s The World Today, he did not get a chance. Soon after arriving in the city the group was mobbed:

AUSTIN MACKELL: I was totally doing my job as a journalist. I was interviewing a labour union leader. I was only – I was with a masters student, who’s doing his on labour movements in Egypt, and my translator and the driver. And we got out to interview Mr Fayyumi, we had time to shake hands and we were immediately set upon. So there was not chance for us to give any provocation.

SIMON SANTOW: And you were accused of offering money to local youths in order for them to cause chaos?

AUSTIN MACKELL: Yeah, yes. I mean this is the standard line that the people who are protesting, that the people who are fighting for their rights in any regard are actually being paid by foreign agents. This is the line that state TV has run with on a number of occasions in similar cases, and it’s what happened with us as well.

SIMON SANTOW: And you can be absolutely unequivocal that you were there entirely just as a journalist?

AUSTIN MACKELL: Absolutely.

SIMON SANTOW: No crossing of any line?

AUSTIN MACKELL: No crossing of any line.

[The World Today]

It seems the arrest of Mackell is part of the general crackdown on foreigners instigated my the military regime as a way of undermining protest against continuation of the Junta’s anti-democractic policies.

There are reports that the charges against Mackell and the others have been dropped, but I can’t confirm it.


Another fine communist journalist. Paul Foot 1937-2004

February 13, 2012

I was reminded of Paul Foot again today. It happens from time to time. So it seemed appropriate to remember visiting his memorial site in Highgrove cemetery in north London. I was there in October 2008 for  a brief visit.

Of course it was a treat to stand next to Karl Marx memorial headstone and have my picture taken. What i wasn’t quite prepared for was the mixed company in which the brilliant socialist theorist and agitator is resting [his remains were moved to the current spot many years ago].

He is now in the growing series of EM posts covering the lives of communist journalists.

Just across the path from Karl’s impressive memorial is a small, black headstone that marks the last resting place of journalist Paul Foot. The epitaph on Foot’s headstone is from Percy Shelley’s epic poem, The Mask of Anarchy. The poem was written as a lyric response to the Peterloo massacre and it’s a stirring call to revolution. On 16 August 1819 a cavalry charge into a crowd at Peterloo near Manchester was ordered by magistrates, to break up a protest of 50,000 demonstrating for parliamentary reform . 18 people were killed and over 500 injured.

[Account of the Peterloo events from Spartacus]

Paul Foot memorial headstone in Highgate cemetery, London

‘Rise like Lions after slumber
In unvanquishable number -
Shake your chains to earth like dew
Which in sleep had fallen on you -
Ye are many – they are few.’

I have always admired Paul Foot, he was a much-lauded investigative reporter and he was a lifelong socialist revolutionary. This is a rare combination and one that can cause grief for those who publicly adhere to their beliefs and attempt to have a career in the mainstream.

Tam Dalyell wrote a fantastic obituary in the Independent when Foot died at the age of 66 in July 2004. He was a respected reporter and editor in newspapers and magazines, but he also contributed and edited the Socialist Worker-a far cry from the mainstream.

Paul Foot was the finest polemical writer of his day. He was the staunch friend of lost causes, and so staunch and sustained that his timescale for crusades was measured not in years – let alone months, weeks or days – but in decades. The names of James Hanratty, Helen Smith, Carl Bridgewater, Hilda Morrell and Colin Wallace reverberate down the years and bear testimony to Foot’s persistence.

[Tam Dalyell's obituary in The Independent]

Foot joined the Socialist Workers Party (SWP) in the 1960s while working as a cadet journalist in Glasgow. He was committed to the socialist cause for 40 years. When I joined the International Socialists in 1977, one of the first books I read about socialist politics was Foot’s little pamphlet, Why you should be a socialist.

“Only the working masses can change society; but they will not do that spontaneously, on their own. They can rock capitalism back onto its heels but they will only knock it out if they have the organisation, the socialist party, which can show the way to a new, socialist order of society. Such a party does not just emerge. It can only be built out of the day-to-day struggles of working people.” –Why you should be a socialist (1977).

You can read a collection of his journalism in two books,  Words are Weapons, or Articles of Resistance. Foot was a contemporary grey collar intellectual. Even though he was Oxford-educated, and liked the poetry of Shelley, he was dedicated to the cause of workers’ liberation. Paul Foot was respected too by his colleagues and contemporaries. Writing in British Journalism Review, Bryan Rostron called him a “star of England”.

Re-reading Paul Foot, only days after his death, what instantly struck me was how his words roar off the page, energising and fresh but above all as ferociously passionate and spot on as the day he wrote them. In that wonderfully direct style, full of wit and brio, one can hear Paul’s own spirited voice. It never wavered. It was not a specially tailored public performance; the man, his life, his work, his titanic integrity and generosity were one. This probably explains how Paul Foot sustained, often against the odds, such an epic and courageous journalistic output. It also explains, I think, why so many fellow journalists and readers loved him.

[Bryan Rostron's obituary in British Journalism Review]

Socialist, journalist, writer Paul FootPaul Foot, 1937-2004

One Foot’s last articles was probably this piece in the Guardian arguing against Tony Blair’s foreign policy positions on Iraq and the “useful” but horrible dictators that the British and other governments have adopted as their own in the war on terror. [Paul Foot 'Our kind of dictators', The Guardian, 9 June 2004]

After his death The Guardian and Private Eye established the Paul Foot Awards for Campaigning Journalism; a fitting memorial. There’s no doubt that Paul Foot deserves his place in the shade at Highate cemetery. If I believed in God or ghosts, I’d be sure that Foot and Marx were having great discussions in whatever place old Communists go when they die.


Serious allegations against an Australian journalist in Egypt

February 13, 2012

Update 11pm Monday 12 Feb

Austin Mackell’s blog, The Moon Under Water is a very interesting log of what’s been happening in Egypt in recent weeks.

It seems that the Australian journalist will be deported from Egypt on the pretext that his visa’s expired.

 

Young Australian journalist Austin Mackell is facing serious charges in Egypt after his arrest over the weekend.

Mackell is a freelance who works for Global Radio News, the Guardian, Al Jazeera and many independent outlets. He has been reporting from the Middle East for some time and covering the Egyptian revolution from the front lines.

Egyptian authorities took him into custody along with an American colleague Derek Ludovici and Aliya Alwi, a local fixer .

The trio is accused of attempting to bribe people into joining a protest strike in the industrial city of Mahalla al-Kobra.

There is an online campaign to free Mackell and his colleagues. It is highly likely that the charges against them are a set up and politically motivated. You can keep up with developments on this story by following #freeaustin on Twitter.

An AAP story gives some details of what happened in the town, where the reporter had gone to meet a contact.

Ms Alwi posted details of the ordeal on her Twitter account, writing early on Sunday Australian time that she and Mr Mackell were being transported to a military intelligence office in the nearby city of Tanta.

A few hours earlier, she wrote: “Report against us filed now. Many witnesses saw us ’offering money to youth to vandalise and cause chaos’.”

Another tweet read: “Charges brought against of inciting protest and vandalism. Witnesses have been produced to confirm it.”

One of those witnesses was eight-years old, she wrote.

The trio apparently first believed the police were trying to protect them after they experienced some aggression from locals.

“Our car got rocked and beaten against the glass, got called a whore and all sorts of things. Police escorted us to station,” Ms Alwi wrote.

[SMH 12 Feb]

What’s very interesting about this story is the trade union and activist connection. Mahalla is apparently a hotbed of working class political opposition to the military regime in Cairo. As far as I am aware Austin Mackell is one of the few reporters on the ground who sees this as an important story.

On the ABC there’s a good interview with another Aussie journalist in Egypt Jess Hill who is working for the Global Mail among others.

She talks about the politics of Mahalla. It seems that Austin Mackell may have come across a story the Egyptian authorities don’t want told.

This is really important, not just as a story of Egyptian politics, but also of what journalists should be doing in Egypt and also because Mackell has been accused of something terrible in terms of journalism ethics.

I am inclined to believe this is a set-up and I agree with what Jess Hill told the ABC, it seems like political activists and independent journalists are being given a message from the regime to stay away from sensitive issues. It would not surprise me if the regime now launched Syrian style raids into Mahalla.

I thing Austin Mackell is innocent of the allegations. Anyone who obviously likes cat must be a good person.


A good start for the Global Mail

February 8, 2012

I’m sure many of us were looking forward to the first edition of the Global Mail this week.

Non-profit online journalism start-up The Global Mail launched today with the aim of providing free, non-partisan coverage of local and international current affairs to a broad audience.

Headed up by Gold Walkley Award-winning journalist Monica Attard as managing editor and former Time Inc. editor Jane Nicholls as CEO, the site will offer features, news analysis and investigations on issues of public interest.

[B&T magazine Monday 6 Feb 2012]

According to start-up editor Monica Attard, the brief is exciting, but tough;

I had long viewed, with a degree of envy, the ProPublica model in the US and wanted to build a site here that carried only public interest journalism — no ads, no subscription, no celebrity stories, no spin, funded philanthropically. So the model was inspired by ProPublica.org, even though we won’t and can’t do investigations alone.

[10 Questions for Monica Attard, The Australian]

I hope this venture into the locally un-proven philanthropic business model of public interest journalism is highly successful.

It deserves to be successful; not least of all because of the hard-work that goes into building something brand-new in as yet unknown territory. I worked with Monica Attard at the ABC and have long admired her work. If the team can hit the ground running this week and next, it could become a must-read site.

It is pioneering in the Australian news market. Perhaps the only previous bench-mark was Margo Kingston’s Web Diary.

The long-term question is really: Can something like the Global Mail sustain itself?

Simply put: How will the reporters, editors, producers, assistants and suppliers be paid?

This is something we all have to turn our minds to at some point.

One way to survive is to become indepsensible and so popular that the concept proves itself worthy of support. But then what do you do?

A sum of capital – as well invested as it can be in these uncertain times – will provide a modest on-going income stream. As long as the balance is maintained slightly in favour of the interest dividend you can continue this way till capitalism freezes over.

It’s anyone’s guess how long that might be given global warming.

I don’t know what the business plan is at the Global Mail, but whatever the idea is, I hope it’s a good one.

The highlights for me on a quick read through over lunch today was a theme of bashing the mainstream media. The writers didn’t do it themselves, but the tone of some chosen quotes gives an indication.

In a Stephen Crittenden story about a blogging theatre reviewer with provocative tendencies, I found this:

One former theatre reviewer for Fairfax and News Limited, who asked not to be named for contractual reasons, told The Global Mail: “The pressure is on reviewers to be polite. We now have a situation where newspapers need arts companies maybe slightly more than the arts companies need them. Editors are far less likely to run a bad review for fear of a breakdown in the relationship in the fight for advertising dollars. They won’t say this publicly, but reviewers ‘disappear’ because they’re too harsh.”

[Now everyone really is a critic]

Oh dear, we can’t even trust theatre reviews in the paper anymore.But what’s this? Public interest journalism and already we have sources being hidden from the reader. Not necessarily a cardinal sin, but interesting.

My favourite was this grab from Richard Ackland in Mike Seccombe’s piece about why we don’t understand the Occupy movement in Australia:

“I haven’t read anything comprehensive or interesting in Australia. You’d think there would be some sort of analysis, some sort of long-form journalism, that looked at these things [equality issues]. But no.”

[Rising with a bullet]

There has been coverage of the Occupy movement in the MSM. but Ackland is right about one thing. It hasn’t been very good.

Seccombe’s piece looks at the statistics about who makes up the ‘one percent’ in Australia, or where, more accurately the dividing lines are drawn. Useful ammunition.

Bernard Lagan’s piece on Gillard’s leadership issues was also a good read. He even wryly acknowledges at the conclusion that it is journalists like him who have previously let the public down in terms of political coverage.

On Friday, Feb. 3, [Gillard] lamented that Bob Hawke had gained more media coverage for downing a beer at the Sydney Cricket Ground during the Australia versus India test than she gained for announcing a $95 million boost to cricket’s infrastructure.

She’s right, of course. And it does people like me no credit at all.

[Prime Minister on hold]

It will be interesting to see how this new and potentially game-changing online start-up works out.


Enter the Argus: a home for new journalism

February 8, 2012

The Argus building in downtown Melbourne was once the home of an important Melbourne newspaper. It’s now on the list of Melbourne history walks. I have a scary hare-brained idea that we might be able to restore, renovate an re-occupy this space as a new hub for new public interest and citizen journalism.

Notable features

This Argus building is a fantastic combination of many of the Interwar styles, a Stripped Classical composition with Beaux-Arts, Chicagoesque and Moderne influences. A stuningly regal classical cooling tower is a prominent feature of the Argus building.

The Argus building cnr La Trobe and Elizabeth sts

History

The Argus Building the former headquarters of Melbourne’s Argus newspaper, one of the city’s most popular until the 1960s.

The Argus newspaper took over Melbourne’s first daily newspaper, the Daily News, in 1852 and took a conservative line until 1949 when it was acquired by the London Daily Mirror group. The Argus closed in 1957.

In the 1980s a cement render was applied to the facade of the building, changing the texture of the stone facade.

In 2004, La Trobe University purchased the building with the view of restoring it and use it as a CBD campus.  The  plans included completing the clock tower of the original design.  However the costs of renovating the building and removing asbestos proved too high and the university sold the building late in 2008.

Architect: Godfrey & Spowers

My attention was drawn to this by Melbourne Lord Mayor Robert Doyle. Doyle took listener’s calls today on Jon Faine’s ABC704 program.

He got a question about the Argus building, on the corner of La Trobe and Elizabeth streets, which has been empty and for the most part derelict for some time.

The building has a chequered commercial history following closure of the Argus in 1957.

It has been in a parlous state of repair for a decade or more. Some enterprising explorers have managed to get inside the building at different times and some good pics are around of the cool, but bashed around interior.

No finger prints: the interior of the broken Argus

Argus building expected to fetch $12 million
By Peter Semple
June 5 2002

The building that formerly housed one of Melbourne’s most famous newspapers, The Argus, is on the market again and expected to fetch up to $12 million for owners Ryssal-Three.

The La Trobe Street building seems likely to become an apartment building with the current surfeit of office space either planned or under construction across town.

The Melbourne City Council has approved several applications for residential conversion and the addition of two to four more floors. The latest approval has been for office space and an additional three levels. However, apartments or serviced apartments, or even a boutique hotel now seems more likely.

Owned by the Stamoulis family through its company Ryssal-Three, the property has been on the market twice in recent years without success. In July 2000, it had an asking price of $9.95 million and in September that year the asking price had dropped to $9 million.

The seven-level building on a 2000-square-metre corner site opposite Melbourne Central was completed in 1926, renovated in 1990, and upgraded in 1996. It has a net lettable office area of 10,000 square metres and a frontage of 65 metres to Elizabeth Street and 30 metres to La Trobe Street.

The building is now vacant with the exception of two retail stores – the Argus Cafe and the Genius camera store – on the ground floor.

According to conjunctional agents CB Richard Ellis and Colliers International, the building has been extensively demolished inside, including the removal of asbestos, and is ready for redevelopment.

Ryssal-Three was also the owner and developer of the adjoining building, the Argus Centre. The 34-storey office building (23 office and 10 car parking) was completed in 1991 and sold to Property Income Investment Trust (now Macquarie Office Trust) for $95 million in October 1998.

[Walking Melbourne Argus building forum]

La Trobe University took legal action against the vendor of the property over the 2004 sale. The uni claimed the developer had misled it over the state of the building.

The central issue was the cost of removing asbestos from the old building.

The matter settled out of court.

11 May 2013 update:

I have removed several identifying words and phrases from this piece at the request of one of the business people involved in the 2004 sale of this building and subsequent legal action at the persistent request of the person involved. It shits me to do this and it’s a hassle that completely fucks with the historical record.

I haven’t done it because I’m intimidated, or because I believe in the concept of ‘f0rgetting’ on the internet. I’ve done it because I cannot be fucked with the hassle from the person concerned who badgered me to take it down. I am not going to take it down, and if you want to know any more about the company or individuals involved, you can google the story for yourself

MELBOURNE property developer XXXXXX [redacted] stands accused of misleading and deceptive behaviour over the sale of the historic Argus building on the corner of

The rendered exterior of the Argus bldg

Elizabeth and La Trobe streets that left its new owner, La Trobe University, with an asbestos and lead paint clean-up bill of nearly $16 million.

An environmental report on the building, which once housed the The Argus newspaper, also revealed it was contaminated with pigeon excrement.

The lawsuit takes aim at XXXXXX director XXXXXXX XXXXXXX [redacted], whom La Trobe claims “aided, abetted, counselled, procured and was knowingly concerned” in contravention of the Trade Practices Act when the Argus building was sold in 2004 to the university for $8 million.

Mr XXXXX told BusinessDay he “vigorously denied the allegations” and would “strongly defend the case”.

UPDATE: Federal Court proceedings in this matter were dismissed and there was no order as to costs. La Trobe University is no longer pursuing this matter, and the University and XXXXX have no further comment to make.

Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/business/la-trobe-fights-XXXX-over-16m-cleanup-20090331-9idc.html#ixzz1lk6msE2L

Further update: XXXX XXXXX of XXXXXX has made contact with Ethical Martini over this piece. He is at pains to remind us that no action was taken and that all actions against him and against XXXXX for this matter are settled.

Mr XXXXX writes: “an update posted by the Age [shows] the case was dropped by La Trobe University years ago. It was an accusation that was unfounded and was withdrawn, this was unfortunately not picked up by The Age in another article which leaves the accusations open ended on the internet, the best they could do was paste an update across the article when you open it, unfortunately the clarity doesn’t come up in the opening lines only the accusation (as with your posting…see below). The legacy is that the article remains as does your post. It shows up every time you google XXXXXX or XXXX XXXXX I had hoped the article would over the years eventually become “fish & chip paper” (no disrespect intended) however the internet serves as a different platform and it continues to be the feature article when you do a search.”

I am happy to put Mr XXXXXX’ side of the story and wish him no harm, but I am not going to butcher my own blog for the sake of some business guy’s reputation.

The asbestos issue is interesting. The 2002 news report quoted above suggests the asbestos was removed some time ago, but the La Trobe case suggests that the university had to pay double the purchase price ($8 million) for the asbestos removal.

The building still attracts interest from people who think it would be great to live there. But Robert Doyle inspired me to imagine a different future for this building.

What if we could somehow reclaim it and turn it into a new home for journalism in Melbourne. Perhaps it could be a hub for new start-ups. Maybe Crikey could move into one floor and the various Melbourne journalism schools each have space there for student publications and broadcasts.
It would make a great centre for citizen journalism and indymedia-style operations in the heart of the city. It’s a shame that La Trobe abandoned the building in 2008, it would have made a great city campus. It sill could, but the investment would be in the tens of millions of dollars.
However, perhaps all is not lost. In March 2010 it was reported that an ‘education entrepreneur’ had bought the building and it was to become a campus after all.

LA Trobe University has offloaded its asbestos-riddelled Argus newspaper building for $15 million, after spending $34 million trying to get a project off the ground.Education entrepreneur Shesh Gale, owner of the Melbourne Institute of Technology operation which targets international and domestic students, plans to redevelop the 84-year old building into a teaching facility.The Australian reports Mr Ghale will spend about $50 million on the renovation, which should be completed by the end of 2011.It’s expected Mr Ghale will sell a Lonsdale Street office which currently houses MIT students. The education focused property developer is also building an $80 million facility in William Street which also includes student accommodation, The Australian reports.

The building was the scene of a dispute between vendor La Trobe University, and the private developer the school bought the building off, after it was discovered “larger-than-expected” amounts of asbestos.

[Realestatesource.com]

The facade of the building is protected under a 2011 heritage order. But unfortunately the trail goes cold at this point.
I can’t help but wonder what is going to happen now. It would be good to save this old icon, but it would be even better to turn it into an independent news outfit that could rise, Phoenix like, from the dust of the derelict.


Scooped: The politics and power of journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand

February 7, 2012

Hot off the press

Scooped is finally available. You can order online from Exisle Books

This book is the first new text on New Zealand journalism in ten years. Scooped is an edited collection of essays canvassing the politics and power of journalism and the news media in New Zealand today.

Scooped: The Politics and Power of Journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand critically examines some of the most pressing economic, political, social and cultural issues facing journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand. Approaching journalism as a field of cultural production, the book brings together contributions from a diverse list of academics and journalists, and interrogates the commonsense assumptions that typically structure public discussion of journalism in Aotearoa New Zealand. Rather than simply treating power as something others have, and politics as something that the media simply covers, the book situates journalism itself as a site of power and cultural politics. Lamenting the often antagonistic relationship between journalism and academia, the book offers a vision of a critically engaged journalism studies that should be of interest to academics, students, journalists and general readers.

 

Read the rest of this entry »


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