The “godfather” of Chinese blogging: Isaac Mao in New Zealand

October 20, 2009

I’ve had the privilege in the last couple of days of spending quality time with Isaac Mao, the well-known Chinese blogger and social media enthusiast.

Isaac is in New Zealand this week on a speaking tour of J-schools generously sponsored by the Asia-New Zealand Foundation. Isaac’s passionate commitment to free speech and democratic ideals is clear from his thoughtful and fact-packed presentations. My only regret is that more of New Zealand’s blogging community didn’t take advantage of his two speaking dates in Auckland to actually meet with Isaac.

Despite the fact that a lot of people who should have known better chose to ignore what I think is an important event of interest to Kiwi bloggers, some media have taken a great interest in Isaac’s commentary on social media and the blogosphere in China.

Isaac Mao on Asian Report with Jason Moon National Radio 20 Oct 2009

more about “The “godfather” of Chinese blogging |…“, posted with vodpod

more about “World TV Ltd – www.wtv.co.nz“, posted with vodpod

You still have a couple of chances in Wellington, Christchurch and Rotorua, it is well worthwhile. Isaac is on his way to Los Angeles whree he is a speaker at UCLA’s 40th anniversary of the Internet conference. He’s also a fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University.2009


News reporting faces web challenge, warns NYT editor : CyberJournalist.net

January 6, 2008

News reporting faces web challenge, warns NYT editor : CyberJournalist.net

Bill Keller, the executive editor of the , warned last week that reliable news reporting is dwindling, speaking at the Hugo Young memorial lecture in London. Keller said bloggers, internet search engines and satirical talk shows had blossomed across the world but could never replace reporting.


Citizen Journalism at War

January 6, 2008

Citizen Journalism at War
Video sent by 18doughtystreet

Broadcast Journalist David Heathfield’s report investigating the impact of citizen journalism on war.


Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007 : CyberJournalist.net

January 4, 2008

Citizen journalism dominates online news in 2007 : CyberJournalist.net

I will come back to this, it’s the story of the year for 2007.
Professional journalists are getting the wagons in a circle, and quickly too. Is this a good thing.
This is really grist to the mill(stone) of the book I’m writing now. I said earlier last year (is it that time already) that I’d blog the book and this is the first entry.
more….later


Can citizen media be a business?

September 27, 2007

I’m really interested in this project being organised by Dan Gillmor and the Center for Citizen Media.

September 24th, 2007 by Dan Gillmor

Good news: We’re about to launch a first in a series of postings about citizen media as a business. Specifically, we’ll be exploring possible business models for citizen journalism and the processes surrounding the creation of a website.

The principal researcher and writer for this project is Ryan McGrady, a new media graduate student at Emerson College where he is studying knowledge, identity, and ideas in the information age. (See more about Ryan here.)

These postings will become elements of a comprehensive on-line guide. Needless to say, it’s an ambitious project.

Because of that, we’ll post these pieces with the initial understanding that they are works in progress—beta versions—of what will continue to evolve and improve. We hope you’ll join in a conversation about these topics, and help us make the guide better.

Which means we’d love to hear from all of you who read, write, publish, analyze, discuss, create, record, or otherwise produce or consume media. Your feedback, additions, corrections, and questions are welcome as invaluable perspectives on these broad, evolving areas. If you want to join in, please post a comment or send us a note via email or this form.

(Note: This project evolved from a collaboration with the Citizen Media Law Project at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, a project funded via the Knight Foundation’s News Challenge. Also supporting this work is a grant from the McClatchy Co.)


The Future of Citizen Journalism

July 5, 2007

AlterNet: MediaCulture: The Future of Citizen Journalism

This is an interesting column from AlterNet on the future of citizen journalism.

I’m collecting this sort of stuff now because I’m writing a book. The working title is Journalism in the Digital Age: Reporters, reportage and the public sphere. I’m interested in commentary as I go along and I’ve decided on a small experiment: I’m going to blog the book as I write it.

I’m not quite sure what that really means at this point. Perhaps I’ll put extracts or ideas up here for you to question and comment on. I suppose this is really the first entry in that process.


All journalists and citizens need to worry about this

April 22, 2007

Press Gazette – Citizen Journalists in France threatened with arrest

This is a very alarming development, I suppose the law has been in place for a while (since March 3 2007), but its use against journalists, or anyone recording an event of public interest as opposed to just capturing a “happy slapping” moment is alarming.

Here’s a grab of the blog report linked to above:

I was present at the riot. I Twittered a series of eight live messages. I took photos. At one point, a police officer asked me to hand him my camera. I showed him my press card and I carried on taking photographs. An hour later, I uploaded the images to the photosharing site Flickr. And a day later, I noticed a comment by Mo, a fellow Flickr member, below one of the 24 images. He wrote: “I got all the photos and videos I took yesterday on my cameraphone deleted by a policeman, who told me he would arrest [me] if he ever saw me doing [it] again. I don’t know if he had the right to erase the photos. I should see about that.”

I’ve never been one to favour laws against journalism, or any kind of government regulation. This is why.
I hope to post more on why I don’t support the outdated notion of the “Fourth Estate”, but it’s ironic that it was really a product of the French revolution.
The bottom line is that was a bourgeois revolution and now that the bourgeoisie is the ruling class and its global dominance is complete, it doesn’t need freedom of the press, not even in the nation that gave us the classic slogan of liberation: liberte, egalite, [humanite]. Of course the original was ‘fraternite’, brotherhood in other words. I’ve updated it on behalf of (not really, more in support of) the sisterhood.


CNN alrady in the "firing line"

April 17, 2007

Well, it didn’t take long! CNN is now hosting ‘eye witness’ footage and audio on its website. Apparently taken on a cell phone by Virginia Tech student Jamal Albarghouti. Here’s a report about it from Digital Spy.
How does this sit with the Poynter’s advice about using eye witness reports?

Eyewitnesses verify identities of those who contact you to talk about what they saw or heard. Dont get snookered by someone who pretends to have been there. Verify the authenticity and legitimacy of eyewitness accounts before you use them.

Video/Pictures/Sound from Eyewitnesses This content is NOT being gathered by journalists. They are eyewitnesses or participants in the story. The content they offer may be authentic, but journalists have an obligation to verify that authenticity before using it online, on the air or in the paper.


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