Waihopai jury – I’m on your side.

March 20, 2010

The next tinpot “security expert”, armchair jurist or newspaper columnist who farts on about how the jury in the Waihopai sickle-slash case “got it wrong” is in for a big surprise.

I am [note to dribblejaws],” metaphorically”, not literally, going to ride my bike over to their place and slash them a new wingnut with my scythe.

The jury made a decision based on the evidence and the arguments presented. A not guilty verdict is still a verdict.

Leave it at that, but no…this is political, so the jury’s fucked and the law’s an ass. At least that’s true if you think the war in Iraq and the presence of Kiwi SAS troops in Afghanistan is a good thing.

Well I don’t. I think the jury got it right and I think that the verdict shows that ordinary New Zealanders are sick and fucking tired of the lies about “freedom” and “defending” our way of life while we [the major western powers] casually murder women and children “over there”. al Qaeda is not coming to the rugby world cup, so we should leave the Afghan people alone too.

Waihopai jury: congratulations on a sane and honourable verdict.

[Sunday morning update: I know I’m right, Michael Laws takes a reasonable stand:

12 completely mad Wellingtonians staged their own protest and found three guilty “peace” activists not guilty. Lord knows why. A protest at the food, or the rate of pay? A sick St Patrick’s Day joke? Whatever the spite, it was a perverse finding. (Deluded jury lets greenies plant seeds of terrorism)

Blame the jury Michael, that’s the ticket]

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Does news HAVE a future?

April 28, 2007

It’s probably still a rare thing for a blogger to actually advertise a rival blog in a post, but here goes. This deserves a shout. I got this message from Steve Borris, the associate director of the Center for the Application of Information Technology at the Washington University in St Louis. I’ve had a quick tour of “the future of news” and it’s probably going to become a regular stop on my rounds of the blogosphere. It’s covering some of the same ground as me, but ventures into technology a bit more than I might do. The “future” of news and journalism is a subject close to my own intellectual interests and my own passions about the future of journalism (but not as we know it). I will add a permanent link in my own blogroll, but for now, check it out. Here’s the gist of Steve’s message:

Hello,

I would like to call your attention to “The Future of News” blog that was launched last month. It is a spin-off of a college course by the same name that I teach at Washington University in St. Louis. This site provides a vision of what news will look like 5-15 years from now. It also provides ongoing commentary on how closely day-to-day events fit this vision. While most web-based information on the future of news tends to focus on the perspectives of those involved with current news organizations or technology, this site will also incorporate perspectives from history, political science, consumer marketing, economics, and finance. This should be evident in the three permanent articles that I have posted on the site: News as it was meant to be, Four advances that set news back, and The future of news.


welcome to this blog

April 13, 2007

This is my blog, I suppose all of you Cool Hand Lukes out there knew exactly what was going to go into your first post. I’ve got no idea.
This is a blog about journalism and ethics, it might also be about other things. Time will tell.

I recently arrived in Auckland, the commercial and media capital of New Zealand to take up a new job as Curriculum Leader, Journalism in the School of Communication Studies at AUT. By reputation it’s one of the best and biggest j-schools in the country and a challenge for me to lift the game – from being an Institute of Technology to being a university.

I’m also interested in media ethics. I’ve written a book with my colleague Roger Patching on journalism ethics and it’s just about to be released in a second edition.

I’m currently working on some case studies featuring New Zealand media ethics. I’m interested in hearing from people who have a story to tell.