Karl Marx fails in the university annual review

May 18, 2012

[Hat-tip Peter T of Wellywood]

I wrote briefly the other day about the life of a grey collar intellectual and how it is measured in terms of research outputs in a Taylorist way.

My friend Peter sent me a link to this strange little text-to-movie piece that explores what would happen to Karl Marx today in higher education.
Welcome to the Department of Omnishambles in the Faculty of Inhumanities.

The Department of Omnishambles. Click image to load video and hear Karl’s review


No Future! A pessimistic and money-grubbing view of journalism

October 13, 2009

The Philistine phase of the digital age is almost over. The aggregators and the plagiarists will soon have to pay a price for the co-opting of our content. But if we do not take advantage of the current movement toward paid-for content, it will be the content creators, the people in this hall, who will pay the ultimate price and the content kleptomaniacs will triumph.

Rupert Murdoch, Beijing, October 2009

The writing is on the wall…but actually the content creators were not in Beijing with Rupert Murdoch; they’re scattered across the globe and Murdoch wants their content, he just doesn’t want to pay for it.

Can you imagine a future without journalism: a time in which journalists are replaced by “content directors” and amateurs?

As journalist and commentator Peter Kirwan put it in Wired magazine:

If traditional journalism is too expensive, and if user-generated content really is “good enough”, the way forward seems obvious.

For some news industry managers, this is a happy prospect: they can legitimately get rid of the expensive journalists, take your amateur copy for free and rake in the profits.

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And the beat goes on, or blogging a dead horse

July 23, 2008

I’ve been keeping an eye on the Beat Blogging trend in journalism. I’m not sure where it’s going, but, as I suspected, something’s got to give.

Beat blogging is the reportorial art of encouraging, inveigling and cajoling your local contacts to help you out via social networking. It’s a cool idea and one that journalists with a digital brain will one day figure out.

But, if you’re going to do the beat blogging shtick, what are you – as a savvy young reporter, with a job – going to ditch?

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